Seven Wonders of the World

Seven Wonders of the World, preeminent architectural and sculptural achievements of the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East, as listed by various observers. The best known are those of the 2nd-century-bce writer Antipater of Sidon and of a later but unknown observer of the 2nd century bce who claimed to be the mathematician Philon of Byzantium. Included on the list in its eventual form were the following:

McDonald's Corporation. Franchise organizations. McDonald's store #1, Des Plaines, Illinois. McDonald's Store Museum, replica of restaurant opened by Ray Kroc, April 15, 1955. Now largest fast food chain in the United States.

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Pyramids of Giza, the oldest of the wonders and the only one of the seven substantially in existence today.

Hanging Gardens of Babylon, thought to be a series of landscaped terraces, exact location unknown, generally ascribed to Queen Sammu-ramat, King Nebuchadrezzar II, or the Assyrian king Sennacherib.

Statue of Zeus at Olympia, a large ornate figure of the god on his throne, made about 430 bce by Phidias of Athens.

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Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, a structure famous for its imposing size and for the works of art that adorned it.

Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, monumental tomb of the Anatolian king Mausolus built by his widow Artemisia.

Colossus of Rhodes, a huge bronze statue built at the harbour of Rhodes in commemoration of the raising of the siege of Rhodes (305–304 bce).

Pharos of Alexandria, the most famous lighthouse of the ancient world, built for Ptolemy II of Egypt about 280 bce on the island of Pharos off Alexandria.

Some early lists included the Walls of Babylon or the Palace of King Cyrus of Persia in place of one of the sites noted above.

(See also Artemis, Temple of; Rhodes, Colossus of; Giza, Pyramids of; Hanging Gardens of Babylon; Halicarnassus, Mausoleum of; Pharos of Alexandria; Zeus, Statue of.)

The seven wonders of Greco-Roman antiquity inspired the compilation of many other lists of attractions, both natural and human-made, by successive generations. Among such lists, all of which are limited to seven “wonders,” are the (architectural) wonders of the Middle Ages, the natural wonders of the world, the natural wonders of the United States, the (architectural) wonders of the modern world, and the wonders of American engineering.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia BritannicaThis article was most recently revised and updated byAdam Augustyn, Managing Editor, Reference Content.

  • Giza, Pyramids of

    Pyramids of Giza

    Pyramids of Giza, three 4th-dynasty (c. 2575–c. 2465 bce) pyramids erected on a rocky plateau on the west bank of the Nile River near Al-Jīzah (Giza) in northern Egypt. In ancient times they were included among the Seven Wonders of the World. The…

  • Hanging Gardens of Babylon

    Hanging Gardens of Babylon

    Hanging Gardens of Babylon, ancient gardens considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World and thought to have been located near the royal palace in Babylon. By the beginning of the 21st century, the site of the Hanging Gardens had not yet been conclusively established. Nevertheless, many theories persisted…

  • Sammu-ramat

    Sammu-ramat, Assyrian queen who became a legendary heroine. Sammu-ramat was the mother of the Assyrian king Adad-nirari III (reigned 810–783 bc). Her stela (memorial stone shaft) has been found at Ashur, while an inscription at Calah (Nimrūd) shows her to have been dominant there after…

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